Tint Regulations

Drive in Style: A Guide to Florida’s Car Window Tinting Laws

Florida Car Window Tinting Laws

When it comes to window tinting your vehicle, it’s important to be aware of the laws and regulations in your state. Florida has specific guidelines on how dark your tint can be, how reflective it can be, and other rules to keep in mind.

In this article, we will discuss the Florida car window tinting laws so you can be informed and make the best choices for your vehicle.

Tint Darkness for Sedans

For sedans, the front windshield must have a VLT (visible light transmission) of at least 28%. The front side windows must have a VLT of at least 28%.

The rear side windows and back window can have a darker tint. However, the combined VLT of the rear side and back window can’t be less than 15%.

Tint Darkness for SUVs and Vans

For SUVs and vans, the front windshield must have a VLT of at least 28%. The front side windows must have a VLT of at least 28%, just like sedans.

The rear side windows and back window can also have a darker tint. But, the combined VLT of the rear side and back window can’t be less than 15%.

Tint Reflection for Sedans and SUVs

The tint reflection for sedans and SUVs must be no more than 25% on the front side windows. The back side and rear windows can have any level of reflective tint.

Other Florida Window Tint Rules and Regulations

In addition to the tint darkness and reflection guidelines mentioned above, Florida has some other rules and regulations regarding car window tinting. Here are some more things to keep in mind:

– Side Mirrors: If the rear window is tinted, the vehicle must have side mirrors on both the left and right side.

– Restricted Colors: The tint color can’t be red, blue, or any shade that could be mistaken for those colors. – Certificates and Stickers: Car owners must have a certificate that indicates the level of tinting on each window.

There must also be a sticker on each window showing the manufacturer’s name or the installer’s name. – Medical Exceptions: Florida state law does allow for medical exemptions regarding window tinting.

To apply, a driver must present a medical certification form filled out by their physician.

Background Information on Florida

Now that we’ve covered the details of Florida’s car window tinting laws, let’s dive into some background information on the state itself.

Location and Borders

Florida is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico to the west, the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Alabama to the northwest, Georgia to the north, and the Straits of Florida to the south.

Its geographical location gives Florida a tropical climate, with hot and humid summers and mild winters.

State Capital and Largest Cities

Florida’s capital is Tallahassee, a city located in the northern part of the state. However, the largest cities by population are all located in other parts of the state.

The largest city is Miami, known for its beaches, nightlife, and diverse population. Other large cities include Orlando, famous for its theme parks, Tampa, a coastal city known for its Cuban population and attractions, and Jacksonville, the largest city by land area in the contiguous United States.

Area and Population

Florida has a total land area of 65,755 square miles and a population of over 21 million people, making it the third most populous state in the country. The state’s economy is largely based around tourism, agriculture, and technology.

With its warm weather and abundance of attractions, Florida brings in millions of visitors each year.

Conclusion

In summary, Florida has specific guidelines on car window tinting that you should be aware of. You should keep in mind the darkness and reflection restrictions, the need for side mirrors if the rear window is tinted, the prohibited tint colors and the requirement of having a certificate and sticker.

Additionally, being familiar with Florida’s location, borders, state capital, largest cities, area, population, and economy can enrich your understanding of the state.

County Information in Florida

Florida is comprised of 67 counties, each with their own unique history, culture, and attractions. In this article, we will go over the names of the counties in Florida, so you can learn more about this diverse state.

Alachua County

Located in north-central Florida,

Alachua County is home to the University of Florida and the city of Gainesville.

Baker County

Located in northeast Florida,

Baker County is known for its outdoor recreational opportunities and historic sites.

Bay County

Located in the panhandle of Florida,

Bay County is home to Panama City Beach and Tyndall Air Force Base.

Bradford County

Located in north-central Florida,

Bradford County is known for its natural beauty and is home to the Santa Fe River and the New River.

Brevard County

Located on Florida’s east coast,

Brevard County is known for its beaches and the Kennedy Space Center.

Broward County

Located in southeast Florida,

Broward County is home to Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, and Pompano Beach.

Calhoun County

Located in the panhandle of Florida,

Calhoun County is known for its rural area and is home to the Apalachicola National Forest.

Charlotte County

Located on Florida’s southwest coast,

Charlotte County is known for its beaches, fishing, and boating.

Citrus County

Located on Florida’s Gulf Coast,

Citrus County is known for its natural beauty and is home to the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge.

Clay County

Located in north Florida,

Clay County is known for its parks and natural areas and is home to the St. Johns River and the Black Creek.

Collier County

Located in southwest Florida,

Collier County is known for its beaches and is home to Naples and Marco Island.

Columbia County

Located in north-central Florida,

Columbia County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Ichetucknee Springs State Park.

DeSoto County

Located in southwest Florida,

DeSoto County is known for its rural areas and is home to Arcadia and Lake City.

Dixie County

Located on Florida’s Gulf Coast,

Dixie County is known for its unique landscape and is home to the Dixie Mainline Trail and the Suwannee River.

Duval County

Located in northeast Florida,

Duval County is home to the city of Jacksonville and is known for its beaches and the St. Johns River.

Escambia County

Located in northwest Florida,

Escambia County is known for its beaches and is home to Pensacola and the Naval Air Station.

Flagler County

Located on Florida’s east coast,

Flagler County is known for its beaches and is home to the city of Palm Coast.

Franklin County

Located in the panhandle of Florida,

Franklin County is known for its beaches and is home to Apalachicola and St. George Island.

Gadsden County

Located in northwest Florida,

Gadsden County is known for its historic sites and is home to Chattahoochee and Quincy.

Gilchrist County

Located in north-central Florida,

Gilchrist County is known for its natural beauty and is home to the Santa Fe River and Blue Springs.

Glades County

Located in south-central Florida,

Glades County is known for its unique landscape and is home to the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation.

Gulf County

Located in the panhandle of Florida,

Gulf County is known for its beaches and is home to Port St. Joe and Cape San Blas.

Hamilton County

Located in north-central Florida,

Hamilton County is known for its rural areas and is home to the Suwannee River and White Springs.

Hardee County

Located in south-central Florida,

Hardee County is known for its agriculture and is home to the Peace River and Hardee Lakes Park.

Hendry County

Located in south-central Florida,

Hendry County is known for its natural beauty and is home to the city of Clewiston and the Big Cypress National Preserve.

Hernando County

Located on Florida’s west coast,

Hernando County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Weeki Wachee Springs and the Withlacoochee State Forest.

Highlands County

Located in south-central Florida,

Highlands County is known for its lakes and is home to Sebring and Avon Park.

Hillsborough County

Located on Florida’s west coast,

Hillsborough County is home to Tampa and is known for its beaches and outdoor activities.

Holmes County

Located in the panhandle of Florida,

Holmes County is known for its rural areas and is home to Bonifay and Esto.

Indian River County

Located on Florida’s east coast,

Indian River County is known for its beaches and is home to the city of Vero Beach.

Jackson County

Located in northwest Florida,

Jackson County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Marianna and the Chipola River.

Jefferson County

Located in north-central Florida,

Jefferson County is known for its historic sites and is home to Monticello and the Aucilla River.

Lafayette County

Located in north-central Florida,

Lafayette County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Mayo and the Suwannee River.

Lake County

Located in central Florida,

Lake County is known for its lakes and is home to Mount Dora, Leesburg, and Clermont.

Lee County

Located in southwest Florida,

Lee County is known for its beaches and is home to Fort Myers, Sanibel Island, and Captiva Island.

Leon County

Located in north Florida,

Leon County is home to Tallahassee and is known for its natural beauty.

Levy County

Located on Florida’s Gulf Coast,

Levy County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Cedar Key and the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge.

Liberty County

Located in northwest Florida,

Liberty County is known for its rural areas and is home to Bristol and the Apalachicola National Forest.

Madison County

Located in north-central Florida,

Madison County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Madison and the Withlacoochee River.

Manatee County

Located in southwest Florida,

Manatee County is known for its beaches and is home to Bradenton, Anna Maria Island, and Longboat Key.

Marion County

Located in north-central Florida,

Marion County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Ocala and Silver Springs State Park.

Martin County

Located on Florida’s east coast,

Martin County is known for its beaches and is home to Stuart, Jensen Beach, and Hobe Sound.

Miami-Dade County

Located in southeast Florida,

Miami-Dade County is home to Miami and is known for its beaches, nightlife, and cultural attractions.

Monroe County

Located in the Florida Keys,

Monroe County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Key Largo, Marathon, and Key West.

Nassau County

Located in northeast Florida,

Nassau County is known for its beaches and is home to Amelia Island and Fernandina Beach.

Okaloosa County

Located in northwest Florida,

Okaloosa County is known for its beaches and is home to Fort Walton Beach and Destin.

Okeechobee County

Located in south-central Florida,

Okeechobee County is known for its lake and is home to the city of Okeechobee.

Orange County

Located in central Florida,

Orange County is home to Orlando and is known for its theme parks, shopping, and dining.

Osceola County

Located in central Florida,

Osceola County is home to Kissimmee and is known for its theme parks and resorts.

Palm Beach County

Located in southeast Florida,

Palm Beach County is known for its beaches and is home to West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, and Boca Raton.

Pasco County

Located on Florida’s west coast,

Pasco County is known for its natural beauty and is home to New Port Richey, Zephyrhills, and the Werner-Boyce Salt Springs State Park.

Pinellas County

Located on Florida’s west coast,

Pinellas County is known for its beaches and is home to St. Petersburg, Clearwater, and Tarpon Springs.

Polk County

Located in central Florida,

Polk County is known for its outdoor recreation and is home to Lakeland, Winter Haven, and the Circle B Bar Reserve.

Putnam County

Located in northeast Florida,

Putnam County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Palatka and the St. Johns River.

Santa Rosa County

Located in northwest Florida,

Santa Rosa County is known for its beaches and is home to Navarre, Gulf Breeze, and the Blackwater River State Park.

Sarasota County

Located on Florida’s southwest coast,

Sarasota County is known for its beaches and is home to Sarasota, Venice, and Siesta Key.

Seminole County

Located in central Florida,

Seminole County is home to Orlando’s northern suburbs and is known for its natural beauty and outdoor recreation. St. Johns County

Located on Florida’s northeast coast, St. Johns County is known for its beaches and is home to St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra Beach, and Vilano Beach.

Sumter County

Located in central Florida,

Sumter County is known for its natural beauty and is home to the The Villages, Lake Panasoffkee, and the Withlacoochee State Forest.

Suwannee County

Located in northwest Florida,

Suwannee County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Live Oak, the Suwannee River, and the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.

Taylor County

Located in north Florida,

Taylor County is known for its natural beauty and is home to the Steinhatchee River and Keaton Beach.

Union County

Located in north-central Florida,

Union County is known for its historic sites and is home to Lake Butler and the Santa Fe River.

Volusia County

Located on Florida’s east coast,

Volusia County is known for its beaches and is home to Daytona Beach, New Smyrna Beach, and Ormond Beach.

Wakulla County

Located in northwest Florida,

Wakulla County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Crawfordville, the Wakulla Springs State Park, and the Apalachicola National Forest.

Walton County

Located in the Florida panhandle,

Walton County is known for its beaches and is home to Santa Rosa Beach, Grayton Beach, and the Choctawhatchee Bay.

Washington County

Located in the panhandle of Florida,

Washington County is known for its natural beauty and is home to Chipley, the Falling Waters State Park, and the Econfina Creek.

Florida Window Tint Law References

If you are planning to have your car windows tinted in Florida, it’s important to know the laws and regulations. The statutes governing window tinting in Florida can be found in the Florida 2016 Statutes under sections 316.2951 to 316.2956.

316.2951 covers definitions related to window tinting, including terms such as VLT (visible light transmission) and AS-1 line (a standard for the shade of tint on the front windshield). 316.2952 covers the restrictions on tinting, including the requirement for at least 28% VLT on the front windshield and front side windows of sedans and SUVs. The combined VLT of the rear side windows and back window can’t be less than 15%.

This section also includes information on the restrictions on reflective tint and the prohibition of certain colors. 316.2953 covers the exceptions for medical conditions, which require certification from a licensed physician.

316.2954 covers the requirement for manufacturers to mark the level of VLT on each piece of window tinting material and the requirement for installers to provide a certificate of compliance with the law. 316.2955 covers the penalties for drivers and installers who violate the law, including fines and the requirement to remove illegal tinting.

316.2956 covers the requirement for law enforcement officers to carry instruments that can measure the VLT of window tinting. Understanding the laws and regulations surrounding window tinting in Florida is important, as violating the law can result in penalties and fines.

By reviewing the Florida 2016 statutes, you can ensure that your vehicle is in compliance with the law. In conclusion, being knowledgeable about Florida’s car window tinting laws is crucial to ensure compliance and avoid penalties.

Sedans and SUVs must have a VLT of 28% or higher on the front windshield and front side windows, with a combined VLT of at least 15% on the rear side windows and back window. Reflective tint should not exceed 25% on the front side windows.

Other factors to consider include the need for side mirrors, restrictions on tint colors, and the importance of certificates and stickers. Furthermore, understanding the county names in Florida provides insight into the unique regions and attractions of the state.

Familiarizing yourself with the Florida 2016 Statutes, specifically sections 316.2951 to 316.2956, is essential to ensure compliance with window tinting regulations. By following these guidelines, drivers can enjoy the benefits of window tinting while staying within the legal boundaries and preserving road safety.

Popular Posts